AUTUMN LECTURE 2017: SUSIE ORBACH

What does Therapy have to say about
personal and political life
and how do we do it?

Presented by: Susie Orbach

Monday 30 October 5.00pm for lecture at 5.30pm (please note the earlier start time than usual)

Central Hall, 2 West Tollcross, Edinburgh, EH3 9BP

Refreshments, included in the ticket price, will be available from 5.00pm

Dr. Susie Orbach is a psychotherapist, psychoanalyst, writer and social critic and co-founder of The Women’s Therapy Centre. Susie is the author of several books including Fat is a Feminist Issue and Bodies.  In her most recent book, In Therapy, she explores what goes on in the process of therapy – what she thinks, feels and believes about the people who seek her help – through five dramatised case studies which were originally broadcast as a Radio 4 series.

In this lecture, Susie will play an untransmitted episode and talk about the issues that come up. She will use the session to make links to and reflect on the pressing political issues of our times.

Tickets: £15 (£7.50, student and unwaged) available at Queen’s Hall Box Office
Box Office hotline: 0131 668 2019, 10am-5pm Monday-Saturday
Online Booking: CLICK HERE 

SPRING LECTURE 2017: Dr Margaret Hannah

Sutherland Trust Spring Lecture
Humanising Healthcare: Patterns of Hope for a System under Strain
Presented by Dr Margaret Hannah

Wednesday 10 May, Lauriston Hall, 28 Lauriston Street, Edinburgh EH3 9DJ
Doors 6.30pm (refreshments) Lecture 7pm.

Current pressures on the NHS have built up as the result of underlying beliefs which underpin structures and behaviours.  Radical renewal of the NHS will come from questioning these assumptions and growing a new culture of health and social care based on a different set of premises.  Offering hope to both NHS and wider public sector colleagues, Margaret Hannah will share her first-hand knowledge of pioneering approaches to service renewal which focus on enhancing human experience and human relations, with a particular focus on her experiences of successful innovation in the culture of care in Fife. MargaretHannah

Margaret Hannah is Director of Public Health for NHS Fife.  She studied medicine at Cambridge University and St Thomas’ Hospital, London and later trained in public health in Hong Kong and London.  Margaret has pioneered fresh thinking in public health and the culture of healthcare.  She was part of a five year enquiry into culture and wellbeing which in 2012 culminated in the publication of The Future Public Health (Open University Press). In 2014, she published Humanising Healthcare: Patterns of Hope for a System under Strain (Triarchy Press).  In addition to her role in Fife, Dr Hannah is a visiting professor at Robert Gordon University and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians.

Tickets: £15 (£5 student and unwaged) available at Queen’s Hall booking office
Booking Hotline: 0131 668 2019, 10-5pm Monday-Saturday
Online Booking: http://www.thequeenshall.net/elsewhere/shows/Sutherland%20Trust%20Lecture-2017

AUTUMN LECTURE 2016: Gillian Ruch

Sutherland Trust Autumn Lecture

Sustaining relationships in austere times: challenges and opportunities

Presented by Professor Gillian Ruch

Tuesday 29th November 2016, Doors 6.30pm (refreshments) Lecture 7pm.

PLEASE NOTE VENUE DETAILS: Ruch Image
Central Hall
2 West Tollcross
Edinburgh
EH3 9BP

Human services professions such as social work, education and health and social care are experiencing a resurgence in interest in relationship–based approaches to practice. The reasons for this renewed interest in relational approaches to professional practice will be outlined and, informed by the psychoanalytic and systemic concepts of curiosity, containment and social defence systems, the nature of these contemporary versions of relationship–based practice will be explored. An argument will be made for a model of practice that embraces and promotes the paradoxical professional qualities of ‘vulnerable competence’ and ‘confrontational empathy’ in order to counter the anxious, austere and avoidance responses to the perverse and pervasive colonisation of practice by New Public Management.

Gillian Ruch is Professor of Social Work at the University of Sussex. She teaches and researches in the areas of child care social work and relationship-based and reflective practice and is committed to enhancing the wellbeing of children, families and practitioners. Her particular interests are in promoting psycho-social research methods and reflective forums that facilitate relationship-based practice. Gillian has co-edited, with Danielle Turney and Adrian Ward, Relationship-based Social Work: Getting to the Heart of Practice. Gillian’s most recent publication Relationship-Based Research in Social Work: Understanding Practice Research, is co-edited with Ilse Julkenen from the University of Helsinki.

Tickets: £15 (£7.50, student and unwaged) available at Queen’s Hall Box Office
Box Office hotline: 0131 668 2019, 10am-5pm Monday-Saturday

Online: Click here

SPRING LECTURE 2016: DESMOND RYAN

IN SEARCH OF THE ‘GOOD ENOUGH ENVIRONMENT’ FOR YOUNG TEENAGERS

Presented by Dr. Desmond Ryan
Wed 18 May 2016, 6.30pm for lecture at 7.00pm
Lauriston Hall, Lauriston Street, Edinburgh, EH3 9DJ
Refreshments are included in the ticket price and will be available from 6.30pmst-ryan

British children consistently score low on comparative measures of self-confidence, while Spanish children usually do well. Sociologically viewed, what makes the difference? Using materials from interviews with Spanish 12-14s selected for high self-confidence, this lecture will present an ecological model of their life-world, emphasising the positive reinforcements such children receive in relationships with family, school and friends. Seen in a psychodynamic perspective, the model of their lifeworld maps very closely onto the separating-towards-independence model developed by Winnicott from his work with very young children. For the infant, the mother IS the environment; for older children the environment is more complex.  In each case it needs to be ‘good enough’ to facilitate development and the confidence to meet the challenges of increased independence. Based on his research Dr Ryan suggests a model to improve not only the self-confidence of our young teenagers, but to provide guidance for anyone facing major life changes.

Dr Desmond Ryan is a former trustee of the Sutherland Trust, and a qualitative sociologist with a special interest in the caring professions. He is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Edinburgh’s School of Health in Social Science and has carried out research at home, in Europe and in Cuba.

Tickets: £15 (£7.50 student and unwaged and Friend of the Trust) available at the Queen’s Hall Box Office or can be purchased at Lauriston Hall on the day.
Box Office hotline: 0131 668 2019, 10am-5pm Monday-Saturday
Online Booking: CLICK HERE

AUTUMN LECTURE 2015: GRAHAM SHULMAN

IN SEARCH OF LOST CONNECTIONS: Experiences in Parent-Infant Psychotherapy 

Presented by Graham Shulman
Wednesday  28th October 2015 6.30pm (refreshments) 
Lecture at 7.00pm
Lauriston Hall, Lauriston Street, Edinburgh EH3 9DJ

Refreshments are included in the ticket price and will be available from 6.30 pm.

In this, his second Sutherland Trust lecture of 2015, Graham Shulman provides a further fascinating insight into the practice of parent-infant psychotherapy and its impact on young lives. Having highlighted in his first lecture the invisibility of infants and Infant Mental Health, and the need for specialist interventions for high-risk infants, Graham Shulman focuses in more detail on his experiences of clinical work with parents and infants. Case history material is used to illustrate how even the most seriously impaired or troubled parent-infant relationships can be repaired, and outcomes improved through parent-infant psychotherapy.

Graham Shulman works for NHS Lanarkshire as a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist. He trained at the Tavistock Clinic in London. He has been involved for many years as a tutor on the Scottish Child Psychotherapy training and has also taught Infant Observation. He is a former Editor of the Journal of Child Psychotherapy and was joint Editor and contributor to the book The Emotional Experience of Adoption: A Psychoanalytic Perspective, published by Routledge in 2008. More recently he has lectured and presented at conferences in Scotland and Northern Ireland on Infant Mental Health, including the World Association of Infant Mental Health Conference in Edinburgh in 2014. He is currently teaching Infant Mental Health to multi-disciplinary professional groups in Lanarkshire.
Tickets: £15.00 (£7.50 Student, Unwaged and Friend of the Trust)
available at Queen’s Hall Booking Office

Booking Hotline: 0131 668 2019, 10 – 5pm, Monday – Saturday

The event will be held at  Lauriston Hall, 28 Lauriston Street, Edinburgh EH3 9DJ

Online Booking: www.thequeenshall.net/elsewhere

SPRING LECTURE 2015: GRAHAM SHULMAN

HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT: The Invisibility of Infant Mental Health

shulmanimage

Presented by Graham Shulman
 Wed 20th May 2015 6.30pm for Lecture at 7.00pm
Lauriston Hall, Lauriston Street, Edinburgh EH3 9DJ
Refreshments are included in the ticket price and will be available from 6.30 pm.

In this lecture, Graham Shulman will provide a fascinating insight into the world of parent-infant psychotherapy whilst arguing that infants are too often the “forgotten patient”. Drawing on his own training and clinical experience he will highlight some key features of a psychoanalytic perspective on infant mental health, and some contemporary research findings in the field. He will discuss the ‘invisibility’ of Infant Mental Health as a social, political, professional and clinical phenomenon, despite key Scottish Government policies, reports and publications which appear to highlight its importance; and consider some of the conscious and unconscious barriers which may account for this.

Graham Shulman works for NHS Lanarkshire as a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist. He trained at the Tavistock Clinic in London. He has been involved for many years as a tutor on the Scottish Child Psychotherapy training and has also taught Infant Observation. He is a former Editor of the Journal of Child Psychotherapy and was joint Editor and contributor to the book The Emotional Experience of Adoption: A Psychoanalytic Perspective, published by Routledge in 2008. More recently he has lectured and presented at conferences in Scotland and Northern Ireland on Infant Mental Health, including the World Association of Infant Mental Health Conference in Edinburgh in 2014. He is currently teaching Infant Mental Health to multi-disciplinary professional groups in Lanarkshire.

Tickets: £15 (£5 student and unwaged) available at Queen’s Hall booking office
Booking Hotline: 0131 668 2019, 10-5pm Monday-Saturday
The event will be held at Lauriston Hall, 28 Lauriston Street, Edinburgh EH3 9DJ
Online Booking: www.thequeenshall.net/elsewhere

AUTUMN LECTURE 2014: PROFESSOR FERGUS MCNEILL

Reforming Narratives:
Is there life after punishment?

Presented by Prof. Fergus McNeill

Wed 29 Oct 2014, 6.30pm for lecture at 7.00pm
Lauriston Hall, Lauriston Street, Edinburgh, EH3 9DJ
Refreshments are included in the ticket price and will be available from 6.30pm

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Reforming Narratives: Is there life after punishment?
In recent years, criminologists have become increasingly interested in the processes by which people stop and refrain from offending. One important strand of ‘desistance’ research concerns the sorts of narrative transformations that people experience in becoming ‘ex-offenders’. There is clear evidence that especially for those who have been involved in persistent offending (and who have been persistently punished) positive change involves a ‘re-storying’ of the self. This lecture explores the creative process of re-storying, using songs written about, by and with prisoners as resources and illustrations. It also examines the challenges faced when these new stories are unheard or disbelieved.

Fergus McNeill is Professor of Criminology and Social Work at the University of Glasgow. Before becoming an academic he worked in drug rehabilitation and criminal justice social work. His research explores institutions, cultures and practices of punishment and rehabilitation. He was appointed Chair of the Scottish Advisory Panel on Offender Rehabilitation in 2011 and has given evidence or advice to governments, parliaments and prison and probation services around the world. He is also a Trustee of several charities including ‘Positive Prisons? Positive Futures…’ and Vox Liminis (whose work will provide the songs used in the lecture). He currently serves on the Poverty Truth Commission.

Tickets: £15 (£10 student and unwaged) available at Queen’s Hall Box Office

Box Office hotline: 0131 668 2019, 10am-5pm Monday-Saturday
Online Booking: CLICK HERE or can be purchased at Lauriston Hall on the day